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Voces Oral History Project Interview with Ward Albro

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0:00 - 0:00 - Preamble

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Partial Transcript: Today is March 31st, 2019. My name is Ruben Paquian and I am interviewing Ward Albro for the Voces Oral History Project. Thank you, Professor Albro, for letting us interview you today.
As we explained earlier, the interviews will be housed at the Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection at The University of Texas campus.
If there is anything you want to discuss and I’m not asking you about it, please let me know. And of course, if you do not wish to answer specific questions, that is up to you.
So, let’s start…

0:37 - Early Life/Education

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Segment Synopsis: Ward was born in San Antonio, Texas, and then moving around the state and country. He spent most of his childhood and early adolescence in Tennessee, Wyoming, and then back to Texas where he went to San Angelo High School in San Angelo, Texas. Ward was aware of the the issue of race relations growing up, but besides a few interactions and teachings from his mother, he never really paid much attention to the state of minorities.

Keywords: Anglo community; Anglos; Barrio; San Angelo; Segregation; U.S Army; World War II

Subjects: African Americans; Afro-Americans; Black Americans; Childhood; Education--Integration; Hispanic Americans--United States; Hispanics (United States); Latino Americans; Latinos (United States); Mexican Americans--Segregation; Segregation; Spanish Americans in the United States; youth

18:39 - Higher Education

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Segment Synopsis: At the age of 17, Albro graduated from San Angelo High and went to study journalism at the University of Houston. There he was involved with the fraternity Phi Kappa Alpha, where he had some Mexican American brothers. Ward took note of race relations during his undergrad time but he was mainly aware of the African American experience. He got married in his third year. He went on to complete his Bachelor's and Master's at U. of H. attending night school. During this time he changed his major to history. Following his Master's degree, Ward moved to Arizona to continue his studies at the University of Arizona. It was here that he decided to make Mexican History his focus. He is concerned about the lack of scholars of Hispanic descent in Mexican American and Mexican History classes

Keywords: Anglo Community; Boarder; Housing Projects; Mexican American; Mexican American Studies; segregation; The University of Arizona; University of Houston

Subjects: Discrimination in higher education; Diversity in higher education; Higher education; Higher education and state; Higher education institutions; Higher education providers; Mexican Americans--Segregation; Minorities in higher education; Public Institutions; Public universities and colleges; Racism in higher education

39:11 - Early Teaching Career/Civic Engagement

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Segment Synopsis: After graduating from the University of Arizona, Albro took his first teaching job at the University of Wisconsin. There, during the height of the Vietnam War, that he supported the school’s Students for a Democratic Society chapter. He participated in rallies and protest against the war and violations of free speech. After one year of teaching he took a position at Texas A&I.

Keywords: Anti War Demonstration; Mexican History; Students for a Democratic Society; Vietnam War

Subjects: African Americans; College students—Education; Minorities in higher education

46:05 - Teaching at Texas A&I/LIfe in Kingsville

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Segment Synopsis: Ward has had a 33-year career at Texas A&I University in Kingsville, during which he has studied the social-political dynamics between Mexican Americans and the dominant Anglo population. South Texas is often neglected in term of Chicano civil rights and Texas A&I was the only place where conversations of Mexican American race relations were challenged, starting within the school, then moving to the town of Kingsville.

Keywords: Anglo; Chicano; Chicano Movement; Dean of Men; Dean of Women; Exon; Gringo; Institutionalized racism; Kings Ranch; Kingsville, Texas; Mexican American; Mexican American Neighborhood; PASO

Subjects: Bill Rentro; Carlos Guerra; Chicano movement; College students—Education; Discrimination in higher education; Diversity in higher education; Higher education and state; Higher education institutions; Hispanic Americans--United States; Hispanics (United States); Jose Angel Gutierez; Latino Americans; Latinos (United States); Mary-Jo Sanders; MAYO (Organization); Mexican Americans--Segregation; Minorities in higher education; Minority women in higher education; Public Institutions; Public universities and colleges; Racism in higher education; South Texas MAYO

62:41 - The Chicano Movement from Texas A&I to Kingsville

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Segment Synopsis: Following challenges within the university against institutionalized racism and underrepresentation, groups such as MAYO and PASO formed within Kingsville but were met with opposition from the community. Those groups had negative interactions with the predominantly Anglo community in an atmosphere of discrimination and racism.

Keywords: Anglo Community; Boycott; Carlos Guerra; Chicano Movement; Discrimination; Exon; Kings Ranch; MAYO; Mexican American; Mexican American Community; Mexican American Neighborhood; PASO; Raza Unida

Subjects: Chicano movement; Discrimination in higher education; Diversity in higher education; Higher education; Higher education and state; Higher education institutions; Higher education providers; Hispanic Americans--United States; Hispanics (United States); Latino Americans; Latinos (United States); MAYO (Organization); Mexican American Youth Organization; Mexican Americans--Segregation; Minorities in higher education; Public Institutions; Public universities and colleges; Racism in higher education; South Texas MAYO

76:04 - Institutionalized Racism Today/The Importance of Education

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Segment Synopsis: Ward sees institutionalized racism in today's society; education is vital for the understanding unfamiliar cultures as a possible cure to racist systems. He created the first-ever Mexican American Studies course; educating Hispanics about the histories of Mexico and colonization helped motivate them to organize and speak up against systems of opposition alongside the Anglo liberals who previously had led the charge.

Keywords: Chicanismo; Emilio Zamora; institutionalized Racism; Mexican American Studies

Subjects: Chicano movement; Diversity in higher education; Emilio Zamora; Higher education and state; Hispanic Americans--United States; Hispanics (United States); Latino Americans; Latinos (United States); Minorities in higher education; Minority women in higher education; South Texas MAYO; youth